Below is my monthly list of blog posts about testing that I read and have found interesting enough to share: 

Browser and Mobile Testing

AUTOMATING VISUAL REGRESSION TESTING, Viv Richards: Really great post about why visual testing is such a hot topic right now and how it improves both the quality and speed of your testing.

Strategies for automated visual regression, Katrina Clokie: what it says — real world tips and strategies on how to add visual testing to your suite.

Dealing with Selenium API Gotchas, Stephen Haberman: Do you want your browser automation tests to stop being flaky? Read this article! A plethora of great advice that I’ve never seen anywhere.

Email Validation Testing: How to Test the Email Functionality of an Application, Nandini K. (Software Testing Help): an encyclopedic post that has everything you need to know about testing the email functionality of an app. And when I say it has everything, I mean it.

Foxdriver: A Node.js Remote Debugging Client, Christian Bromann (SauceLabs): Chrome DevTools has puppeteer, and now, thanks to SauceLabs, Firefox has FoxDriver, an alternative to Selenium WebDriver that works directly with Firefox’s Remote Developer Tools protocol. Love it!

AI and Test Automation

Not Only Cars: The Six Levels of Autonomous Testing, Gil Tayar (shameless plug): Can AI automate this process? Can we make some, or all parts of our testing, and writing our tests, autonomous? Can AI do to writing tests what it is doing to driving?

AI for Testing: Identifying App State, Jason Arbon (AppDiff): how to use machine-learning techniques to make the AI recognizing types of pages automatically.

Dev Testing

The problem that unit tests solve, Theodore Bendixson: a different view on unit tests. Unit tests as a way to test difficult to trigger situations. The example of testing a chess game is spot on! As a lover of integration tests, this take on unit tests explains exactly when unit tests, and not integration tests, are a solution.

Write tests. Not too many. Mostly integration, Kent C. Dodds: Kent Dodds is reading my mind. There is not one sentence in this blog post that I disagree with. This article is a “practical school of testing” article. Read it. Now.

Baseline Testing, Tingan: Tingan gives the case that even unit tests can gain from writing the test validation as baseline testing, vs. checking for explicit results. This approach is heavily used in visual testing, where there is no other option, but has been popularized by Jest’s “snapshot” methods.

Beginner’s Testing

How frontend unit testing turned from a fling to a real thing for me, Mirjam Bäuerlein: “for a long time, all I knew about testing was more on an academic level”. This is a story of Mirjam’s journey from thinking testing is an academic thing, to getting serious about testing.

Funny Tweet, Vranac Srdjan:
YOU ARE IN A LEGACY CODEBASE
> RUN TESTS
YOU HAVE NO TESTS
> READ SPEC
YOU HAVE NO SPEC
> WRITE FIX
YOU ARE EATEN BY AN ELDER CODE HACK.

Microservice Testing: Introduction, Nathan Peck: an introduction to the testing pyramid and how to write testing code. Good introductory article, though mis-named, as it has nothing to do with microservices.

Frontend Development

Building the DOM faster: speculative parsing, async, defer and preload, Milica Mihajlija: an excellent article about how browsers deal with the <script> tag and how developers can use to build faster-loading websites. Excellent in-depth information.

Size Limit: Make the Web lighter, Andy Barnov: I love these kinds of articles which read a bit like detective novels. In this post, our detective slowly uncovers who the murderous npm module is that creates so big a webpack bundle, and shrinks the bundle x5000 smaller.


To read more about Applitools’ visual UI testing and Application Visual Management (AVM) solutions, check out the resources section on the Applitools website. To get started with Applitools, request a demo or sign up for a free Applitools account.

About the Author:

30 years of experience have not dulled the fascination Gil Tayar has with software development. From the olden days of DOS, to the contemporary world of Software Testing, Gil was, is, and always will be, a software developer. He has in the past co-founded WebCollage, survived the bubble collapse of 2000, and worked on
various big cloudy projects at Wix.

His current passion is figuring out how to test software, a passion which he has turned into his main job as Evangelist and Senior Architect at Applitools. He has religiously tested all his software, from the early days as a junior software developer to the current days at Applitools, where he develops tests for software that tests software, which is almost one meta layer too many for him.

In his private life, he is a dad to two lovely kids (and a cat), an avid reader of Science Fiction, (he counts Samuel Delany, Robert Silverberg, and Robert Heinlein as favorites) and a passionate film buff. (Stanley Kubrick, Lars Von Trier, David Cronenberg, anybody?)

Unfortunately for him, he hasn’t really answered the big question of his life – he still doesn’t know whether static languages or dynamic languages are best.

Written by Gil Tayar, Senior Architect at Applitools
30 years of experience have not dulled the fascination Gil Tayar has with software development. From the olden days of DOS, to the contemporary world of Software Testing, Gil was, is, and always will be, a software developer. He has in the past co-founded WebCollage, survived the bubble collapse of 2000, and worked on various big cloudy projects at Wix. His current passion is figuring out how to test software, a passion which he has turned into his main job as Evangelist and Senior Architect at Applitools. He has religiously tested all his software, from the early days as a junior software developer to the current days at Applitools, where he develops tests for software that tests software, which is almost one meta layer too many for him. In his private life, he is a dad to two lovely kids (and a cat), an avid reader of Science Fiction, (he counts Samuel Delany, Robert Silverberg, and Robert Heinlein as favorites) and a passionate film buff. (Stanley Kubrick, Lars Von Trier, David Cronenberg, anybody?) Unfortunately for him, he hasn’t really answered the big question of his life - he still doesn't know whether static languages or dynamic languages are best.